Keynote Speakers

Dr Michelle McQuaid

‘How to Struggle Better’

Wednesday, November 18th @ 9:30am – 11am

Zoom Meeting Room Link

Session Brief

To struggle is human, it is how we learn and grow. But how we think about and react to the struggles, challenges and discomfort we face has a profound impact on the extent to which we are able to feel good and do well each minute, hour, day, week and year of our lives. The reality is there is no avoiding struggle, so in this session we’ll help you to understand how to struggle better by:

·         Getting clear on the value of struggle

·         Learning to spot signs of struggle early

·         Confidently stepping into your struggles to support your learning and growth

·         Finding the tiny positive actions you can take to turn struggles into productive outcomes

Dr Michelle McQuaid

Dr. McQuaid is a best-selling author, workplace wellbeing teacher and playful change activator. With more than a decade of senior leadership experience in large organizations around the world, she’s passionate about translating cutting-edge research from positive psychology and neuroscience, into practical strategies for health, happiness, and business success. Read more at http://www.michellemcquaid.com/


Professor Mick Healey

‘Enhancing student success

through student-staff partnership’

Thursday, November 19th 2020 @ 9:30am – 11am

Zoom Meeting Room Link

Session Brief

The session will be interactive and the handout (below) is for participants to download and read parts of BEFORE the session. 

Universities need to move towards creating inclusive scholarly knowledge-building communities. … The notion of inclusive scholarly knowledge-building communities invites us to consider new ideas about who the scholars are in universities and how they might work in partnership. (Brew 2007, 4)

The global pandemic … has prompted people to question what matters and is necessary … and what perhaps does not matter as much or may not be necessary. (Cook-Sather and Nandeeta 2020, 1)

Ways of engaging students in higher education as partners in learning and teaching is arguably one of the most important issues facing higher education in the 21st Century. In the uncertain environment associated with COVID-19 student-staff partnerships are even more important as a means of enhancing student success. We will unpack what is meant by students as partners and examine four ways in which students may be engaged as partners through: a) Learning, teaching and assessment; b) Subject-based research and inquiry; c) Scholarship of teaching and learning; and d) Curriculum design and pedagogic advice and consultancy. The themes will be illustrated with mini case studies from different parts of the world in both face-to-face and online contexts. We will also discuss the values which should underpin student-staff partnerships and explore how these can be applied in a pandemic world. Participants will be asked to share their stories and approaches to student-staff partnerships at CSU. 

Professor Mick Healey

Mick Healey is an HE Consultant and Researcher and Emeritus Professor at the University of Gloucestershire, UK.  Until 2010 he was Director of the Centre for Active Learning, a nationally funded Centre for Excellence in Teaching and Learning.  He is The Humboldt Distinguished Scholar in Research-Based Learning at McMaster University, Canada. Mick is an experienced presenter.  Since 1995 he has given over 500 educational presentations in more than 25 different countries.  He has written and edited over 200 papers, chapters, books and guides on various aspects of teaching and learning in HE, and has over 10,000 citations.  His latest book is Writing about Learning and Teaching in Higher Education: Creating and Contributing to Scholarly Conversations across a Range of Genres (Healey, Mick, Kelly Matthews, and Alison Cook-Sather, 403pp) and may be downloaded for free.  He is the inaugural Senior Editor of the International Journal for Students as Partners.  He is often asked to act as an advisor to projects, universities and governments on aspects of teaching and learning. He has been a frequent visitor to Australia over the last 20 years and has presented at two-thirds of Australian universities.